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Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Anthropology in the Graduate School of the State University of New York at Binghamton, May 1992 Accepted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Anthropology in the Graduate School of the State University of New York at Binghamton: Charles Cobb, Department of Anthropology {signature} Randall Mc Guire, Department of Anthropology {signature} Copyright © 1992-2016 by allen lutins.

This project would have been entirely impossible if not for leads and tidbits of information passed on to me by numerous people over the years.

Among those who were particularly helpful were (in alphabetical order) John Cavallo, Dena Dincauze, Jonathan Gell and the rest of the staff at New Jersey DEP's Office of New Jersey Heritage (as well as the staff of other DEP offices, including the Division of Coastal Resources and the Division of Fish, Game and Wildlife), Rob Jacoby, Bill Oliver, Leonid Shmookler, and Vin Steponaitis.

Bill Frazier is to be especially commended for the generous amount of information and photocopies which he provided me; and I thank the staff of the Inter-Library Loan office at the Bartle Library at SUNY-Binghamton for processing my numerous (and often arcane) requests.

Special thanks go to Randy Mc Guire, who provided input and valuable feedback on previous incarnations of this project, and both Randy and Charlie Cobb for their editorial advice and guidance.

Charlie was particularly helpful in helping me to locate sources of information pertaining to southeastern archaeology.

For minor but necessary contributions, I gratefully acknowledge the assistance of the New Jersey State Museum staff, and the various archaeologists who have served in the Army Corps of Engineers, New York District over the years.Last but not least, I owe perhaps my greatest debt to my fellow graduate students, too numerous to name, who not only provided me with tips on sources and other useful information, but also maintained the creative, supportive, and cooperative environment necessary for my completing such a task.This thesis is an attempt to synthesize the information for all known prehistoric weirs in eastern North America, and to analyze that information for its importance in reconstructing prehistoric subsistence and settlement patterns.This is the text of my thesis as it was written in 1992.Since that time, a few strides have been made in fish weir research, particularly the new research at Sebasticook Lake (Maine), renewed research at Boylston Street (Boston, Massachusetts), and publication of John Connaway's .There's one HTML feature which may not be obvious: If you click on a note number, which looks like this: [3] you'll be put at the "Notes" section at the end; by clicking on the Note number (which looks like 3.) you'll be returned to your place in the text.