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Her journey begins at a rehabilitation center in Peshawar, where she talks with many young victims caught in the crossfire of this war. There was a note saying that if anyone moved the dead body, they would share its fate.” Before the Taliban took control of Qainat’s village, the women in her family attended university and worked.“We saw the dead body of a policeman tied to a pole,” an articulate young girl named Qainat tells the reporter quietly. But now the Taliban has banned girls from going to school.

BBC: Woman's Hour (March 12, 2009) Pakistan's Child Terrorists Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy talks to BBCs Radio 4 about her film examining how the war on terror is creating a generation of child terrorists.

She describes some of the children she met while filming and a Taliban commander responsible for child recruitment. 23 2009) Class Dismissed in Swat Valley This short documentary profiles an 11-year-old Pakistani girl on the last day before the Taliban were to close down the all-girls school she attended.

Christian Science Monitor (March 9, 2009)Pakistans Tenuous Gains on Taliban A pair of ceasefire agreements with the Taliban in Pakistan -- in Bajaur and the Swat Valley -- have drawn familiar criticism. (Caution: Some disturbing video.) UK Guardian (Feb.

But, as the Christian Science Monitor reports, some counter terror experts believe the lull in fighting could provide Pakistan with the opportunity to bring in more security and development to the region. 24, 2009) Confusion Hangs over Pakistan's pact with Taliban The Los Angeles Times' Laura King reports that terms of a ceasefire agreement between Taliban militants and the Pakistani government remain clouded as Pakistani officials push for more U. 21, 2009) Taliban and Pakistan officials Agree Permanent Ceasefire in Swat Valley The UK Guardian's Jason Burke reports on a ceasefire agreement between Taliban militants and the Pakistani government in the Swat Valley region of the country, and the fear that such an agreement could create a haven for terrorists just 100 miles away from the countrys capital Islamabad. 4, 2009) Ahmed Rashid: Taliban Activity Up in Pakistan Journalist Ahmed Rashid talks on NPRs Fresh Air about recent Taliban advances in Pakistan and the violence there that appears to be escalating.

FRONTLINE/World editors: To protect certain people whose participation in the film may make them the target of threats, we made a decision to block access to the video in Pakistan. The Taliban are closing in, regularly attacking police convoys, kidnapping diplomats, and shooting foreigners.

The fighting across this volatile region has driven thousands of families from their homes and many have found shelter in Peshawar.Correspondent Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy is traveling across her fractured homeland to investigate the rising popularity of a new Pakistani branch of the Taliban, now threatening the major cities, blowing up girls’ schools and declaring war on the Pakistani state.New York Times (April 8, 2009)Corruption Undercuts Hopes for Afghan Police In addition to a shortage of American troops to train the Afghan National Police and Army, a deeply rooted corruption within Afghan law enforcement is an important factor in its lack of effectiveness, writes Richard Oppel of The New York Times.UK Guardian (April 6, 2009) Pakistan court investigates Taliban flogging video In response to public outrage over a video showing Taliban militants flogging a 17-year-old woman, Pakistan Supreme Court chief justice Iftikhar Muhammad Chaudhry launched an investigation into the incident.The Guardian website features the video, which contains some disturbing imagery.New York Times (April 5, 2009) Day of Suicide Attacks Displays Strength of Pakistani Taliban Three suicide attacks in the span of 24 hours could be a sign that the Pakistani Taliban are overwhelming the Pakistan's security forces.